Second Amendment Rights

Second Amendment to the United States Bill of Rights:
“A well-regulated militia being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear arms shall not be infringed.”

Fourth Amendment of the United States of America:
“The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no Warrants shall issue but upon probable cause, supported by oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized.”

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Not owning and knowing how to use a firearm would have been absolutely inconceivable to any person living at the time of the American Founding. Everyone owned a firearm to protect themself and their family, to feed themselves, hunt and sell the surplus game… Even young women learned to shoot during the American Revolution, so the idea that gun ownership should be so heavily restricted by the government is laughable. Think of the purpose of firearms during the late 18th Century – they were used by American Patriots to overthrow the oppressive British government.

Should the need ever arise for the American people to defend themselves, would we have the weapons capability to do so, or will we have been disarmed by the very state we must defend ourselves against?

Take an extreme example – any rebelling Middle Eastern country. The rebelling citizenry has inferior weaponry to the oppressive and dangrous state that they seek to overthrow and replace. Imagine how quick and how much more bloodshed there would be in certain Middle Eastern states if the citizens had No weapons with which to defend themselves.

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If you’re not sure where you stand on gun control, as I was until recently, here’s what some rather important historical figures have had to say…

Admiral Isoroku Yamamoto, head of the Japanese navy during World War II said, “You cannot invade mainland United States. There would be a gun behind every blade of grass.”

One of our Revolutionary War statesman who drafted the Virginia Declaration of Rights, George Mason, said “To disarm the people is the best and most effectual way to enslave them.”

The Founders were not the first to recognize the importance of a well-armed citizenry in the defense of Liberty. Nor were they the last. If you read over Hitler’s Weapons Act, or comments from Heinrich Himmler, you will plainly see how important gun control was to the rise of Nazi Germany.

“The most foolish mistake we could possibly make would be to allow the subjected people to carry arms. History shows that all conquerors who have allowed their subjected peoples to carry arms have prepared their own downfall by doing so. Indeed, I would go so far as to say that the underdog is sine qua non [something essential] for the overthrow of any sovereignty. So let’s not have any native militia or police.”

– Adolph Hitler,
Dictator of Nazi Germany (who rose to power legally ) , Murderer of approximately 11 million people who opposed him, and innumerable others because of his role launching the start of World War II.

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The Prompt for this Blog Post

I was watching The Mentalist, a television show about a police consultant with incredible powers of perception. In the first five minutes of this particular episode, the main character Patrick Jane points out a “suspicious looking” young man wearing an overcoat on a hot day. When the police search this man they find a gun and it seems as though the police had prevented an assassination attempt.

Excuse me CBS, but since when does wearing an overcoat give police probable cause? That unreasonable search and seizure by police on a public street is heralded in the episode. We citizens must be so grateful that the police stopped that man from carrying a gun… No! The Fourth Amendment offers citizens protection from unreasonable search and seizure, while the Second Amendment reserves our right the “keep and bear arms.”

 

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If your mind is not yet made up on the Gun Control issue, here are some links for further reading.

The United States Constitution and Bill of Rights
http://www.ushistory.org/documents/amendments.htm

This link will take you to an opinionated blog post about the foundations of Nazi Weapon Control found in the United States today.
http://usa-the-republic.com/jurisprudentia/firearms_1.html

Wikipedia is not one of my favorite sites. Typically, I if I use it at all, I use it as a springboard for research ideas – it can be a useful place to start.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gun_politics_in_Germany#The_1938_German_Weapons_Act

Quotations are a quick way to gain insight to the opinions of people on an issue. The following links to the “101 of the Best Gun Quotes,” some of which were used in this article.
http://geekpolitics.com/101-of-the-best-gun-quotes-ever/

Another blog site that offers an educated opinion of gun control.
http://guncontrol101.webs.com/introduction.htm
 (The author of this site also recommends http://www.justfacts.com/guncontrol.asp – which offers a great deal of statistical information on gun control. Because of the volume of information this site offers, you will most likely be making multiple trips to the site, so bookmarking is recommended.)

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This post was drafted before the mass shooting in Aurora, CO.  Gun Control has been at the top of hot button issues during this past campaign season, and I have nothing new to add to this conversation since then. Despite the unthinkable evil that happened in Colorado, my belief that the constitutional right for citizens to keep and bear arms should Not be infringed upon. Imagine if the shooter were not the only person with a weapon in the cinema that night… Maybe someone would have shot him first and there would be only one causality instead of 12 people dead, over 50 wounded, and innumerable lives changed.

The following are links to a NY Times tribute article to the victims of the Colorado shooting – which I think correctly focuses attention to the victims and not the shooter.

http://thelede.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/07/22/remembering-the-victims-of-colorado-shooting/

http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2012/07/22/us/Aurora-shooting-victims.html#index

The article also lists ways you can keep the memory of the victims alive using social media.

Rest in Peace:

Jonathan T. Blunk, 26

Alexander Boik, 18

Jesse E. Childress, 29

Gordon W. Cowden, 51

Jessica Ghawi, 25

John Larimer, 27

Matthew R. McQuinn, 27

Micayla Medek, 23

Veronica Moser-Sullivan, 6

Alex M. Sullivan, 27

Alexander C. Teves, 24

Rebecca Wingo, 32

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